Issue: Autumn 2020

In the midst of COVID-19, this issue opens with a topical piece on Chesterton’s ideas about solitude. Greg Sheridan reveals the advantages of switching metaphors in speaking to different audiences. Gary Furnell revisits a neglected Scottish Catholic writer, Bruce Marshall, by looking at his recently reprinted novel, The World, The Flesh, and Father Smith. Karl Schmude contributes two obituaries – one of the Chesterton scholar, John Coates, the other of the Australian poet, Bruce Dawe, while Garry Nieuwkamp’s pick of a Desert Island Chesterton book is his greatest poem, Lepanto (1911).

Lepanto

An unusual slant on offering a single selection for our occasional series, Desert Island Chesterton, is provided by Garry Nieuwkamp, a doctor on the NSW Central Coast who is…

Bruce Dawe – RIP

It is improbable that Chesterton and the Australian poet, Bruce Dawe (pictured), were known to each other, as Dawe was only 6 years old when Chesterton died in…

John Coates – RIP

A notable Chesterton scholar, John Coates (pictured), has died in England at the age of 76. While he produced works of literary criticism on various writers, in particular Rudyard…

Laughter in the Service of Truth – Bruce Marshall

Bruce Marshall (1899-1987) was a Scottish Catholic writer who became best known for a series of novels with religious themes, beginning with Father Malachy’s Miracle (1931). Two of his novels…

Shedding Light by Switching Metaphors

The admiration which the Foreign Editor of The Australian, Greg Sheridan, has for Chesterton is undisguised. He spoke at the 2016 Australian Chesterton conference on the inspiration Chesterton had given…

Chesterton in Isolation

In an article on the BBC website, Worklife (18 April 2020), the British journalist Hephzibah Anderson explored how the life of a hermit might shed light on the…